Lunar Models
Time Machine
modifications
by
Ed Turner

Rear Lamp
&
Dish Support
Page 2

Contact Ed Turner

Pic 10 shows the raw 'socket' that the bulb will be placed into. Drill all the way through this socket, as indicated with arrows. This item can now be painted red, with it's bottom-end masked off, to be painted gold by hand later.
Pic 11 shows the ball with it's electrode cones extending from it. With a very fine drill bit, drill straight into these cones as indicated by arrows. The electrode wires will be later fitted into these cones. Drill a small hole on one side of each cone - the colored coils of wire will be later fitted into these side holes. Pic 11 also shows how the ball should be drilled straight through on either side of the embedded metal rod. The wires from the red bulb will have to be threaded through this portion of the ball.

Pic 12 and 12a shows the stand and indicated with arrows where it should be drilled entirely through the structure. For this also, you will need a fine drill bit and you may have to drill from both ends to continue through the length of the structure. As mentioned before, this item also has a metal rod embedded into it, so you will have to keep as close as possible to the rod while drilling through, making sure the drilled openings are just big enough for the wires of the bulb to be fed through them. Now is a good time to thread the wires through the red painted socket until the bulb sits on top of the socket. A small drop of epoxy on the underside of the bulb will be enough to secure it in place.

I have used a tiny strip of red-colored artist's tape to cover the exposed base of the bulb. Thread the wires down through the ball, fitting and securing with epoxy the end of the socket structure to the ball. Then thread the wires through the remaining stem structure, carefully fitting the ball on top and again securing with epoxy. Make sure the entire assembled structure remains as straight up & down as possible while the epoxy sets. Don't worry about any seepage of glue at this point - it can be cleaned up later. Once the epoxy has set, you can clean any glue that is exposed using an X-acto knife and can be sanded smooth if necessary. You can also fill in any open gaps with either epoxy or body filler to clean up the look of the piece.

Mask off the red bulb and it's socket with masking tape and paper, so that no gold paint will get on them. You may also want to cover the wires that are dangling from the bottom so as not to get gold paint on them either if you desire. I hung the structure upside down by the wires in order to easily spray paint the item on all sides. It's at this time that you can apply a thin coat of primer. I found a beautiful gold spray paint by Krylon that's called 14 Kt. Gold. It has a nice shine and luster to it's finish. Be careful not to over-spray the item - you want to keep the details crisp. Two light coats should be good.

When the structure is completely dry, you may want to use a tissue, a soft rag, or even a thin pair of gloves to handle the piece after it's been painted. Gold paint is very susceptible to fingerprints and smudges that will not polish off, so it may be a good idea to not touch the finish with your bare hands.

Pic 13 shows the finished gold. You can also see where I covered the base of the bulb with a small strip of red tape. After removing all the masking material, you can now paint by hand the lower portion of the socket with the same gold paint, by spraying a bit of the paint into the cap of the paint can and using a fine brush.
Pics 14 and 14a show the finish in more detail. You can also see where I've drilled the side holes on the electrode cones, then painted the cones by hand in the appropiate red, yellow and green colors. You can also see a thin band of green paint around the stem, the same green as used before. If you remember, we left the bulb itself a smokey sanded finish. Simply paint on a coat or two of clear lacquer finish. The bulb is now back to it's shiny self!
Next time, the control console!

 

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The Time Machine Project 1998 Don Coleman
Web Site 1999 Don Coleman
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